A Collection of Iced Teas

Iced Teas

One of the classic summer drinks that we tend to go for is Iced Tea. Simple, easy, delicious and refreshing, it’s amazing how it just seems to hit the spot. One of the problems though that I seem to find though when I brew it is that it sometimes takes on a bitter taste from the tea itself. I found a tip online years ago that alleviates this problem. Simply add a pinch of baking soda to the hot water when brewing the tea. It magically counterbalances this acidity/bitterness from the tannins in the tea, and leaves you with a smooth taste.

The collection of teas below are all of a sweet variety, but you can leave out the sugar in any of them if you prefer unsweetened tea. Another tip, if you plan on keeping tea in the fridge for several days, don’t leave citrus (lemons, limes, etc.) in it with the rind/peel on. The natural oils in the peel of the fruit will leech into the tea and give a bitter taste. It is best to add fresh citrus to your glass, or to the pitcher, and then remove it before storing it for the next day.


Smooth Sweet Tea

Ingredients:
1 pinch baking soda
2 cups boiling water
6 tea bags
¾ cup white sugar
6 cups cool water
ice and lemon for serving

Directions:
Sprinkle a pinch of baking soda into a 64-ounce, heat-proof pitcher. Pour in the boiling water and add the tea bags. Cover, and allow to steep for about 15 minutes. Remove the tea bags, and discard them. Stir in the sugar until it has dissolved. Pour in the cool water, then refrigerate until cold. Serve over ice with a wedge of lemon.


Sweet Lime Iced Tea

Ingredients:
1 pinch baking soda
1 gallon boiling water
6 black tea bags (such as orange pekoe)
1 ½ cups white sugar
4 limes, juiced
lime slices for serving

Directions:
Sprinkle a pinch of baking soda into a heat-proof gallon sized pitcher, then add the water and tea bags. Allow the tea to steep for about 45 minutes. Remove and discard the tea bags. Stir in the sugar and lime juice until the sugar has dissolved. Cool to room temperature and refrigerate until cold before serving. Serve over ice with slices of lime.


South Asian Iced Tea

This is a bit of different kind of ice tea, in that it’s a sweet milky tea. Trust me though, once you try it, it will quickly become a favourite!

Ingredients:
9 cups water
8 tea bags black tea (such as orange pekoe)
2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons white sugar
½ cup sweetened condensed milk, divided
½ cup half-and-half, divided

Directions:
Bring water to a boil in a kettle and pour over tea bags in a heat-proof pitcher. Steep the tea for about 5 minutes and then remove the bags from the pitcher. Stir in the sugar in until it has dissolved. Cool the tea to room temperature. To serve, fill a glass with ice, then pour in the cool tea until almost full. Then add 1 tablespoon condensed milk and float 1 tablespoon of half-and-half atop the iced tea.


Hawaiian Plantation Iced Tea

Ingredients:
1 quart barely boiling hot water
4 orange pekoe tea bags
1 quart ice cold water
1 (16 ounce) can pineapple juice
½ cup simple syrup (optional)*
1 fresh pineapple – peeled, cored, and cut into spears

Directions:
Pour the hot water into a large pitcher, and add the tea bags. Steep the tea for about 5 minutes. Remove the tea bags, and pour in the ice water and the pineapple juice. Refrigerate until thoroughly chilled, about 1 ½ hours. Pour the tea over ice, garnish with pineapple spears, and serve.

* To make simple syrup heat ½ cup of water with ½ cup sugar over low-medium heat until the sugar has completely dissolved.


Peach Orange Iced Tea

This fruity tea is a nice twist on traditional ice tea. If you don’t have peaches or clementine, you can use a nectarine or mandarin.

Ingredients:
1 pinch baking soda
1 large fresh peach, sliced
1 clementine, peeled and segmented
1 tablespoon white sugar, or to taste
8 cups boiling water
4 Earl Grey tea bags
ice and peach slices for serving

Directions:
In a large heat-proof pitcher, and the sliced peach, clementine and sugar. Muddle the fruit and sugar to break it down. Add the baking soda, boiling water and tea bags and stir. Refrigerate the tea until cool, about an hour. Using a slotted spoon, remove the fruit and tea bags. Serve over ice with a few slices of peach.

Naturally Flavoured Waters

Flavoured Waters

So with Canada Day behind us, and the hot long summer ahead (sorry GOT fans, winter is not yet coming!), it is important that we stay hydrated! So this week is all about the liquids! And what better way to kick it off than with good ol’ H2O? That reminds me of a bad nerd joke, that you’ll have to forgive me for telling, but I just can’t help myself.

Two scientists walk into a bar. The first one says “I’ll have some H2O.” The second one says, “I’ll have some H2O too.” The second scientist then dies.

All my fellow nerds will get it, for those that don’t, H2O2 (too) is the chemical formula for Hydrogen Peroxide which can kill you if ingested. Hey, I warned you it was a bad joke, don’t shoot the blogger.

So having warmed up the crowd, let’s move on to some great, easy waters, and some of the benefits that they will bring you. Please check out our produce cleaning page to see how to clean all of the fresh produce and herbs used in these recipes. You can check out the page by clicking here.


Apples and Cinnamon Water

Cinnamon helps lower blood sugar concentration and improves insulin sensitivity, while apples have been shown in studies to help a wide spectrum of ailments from staving off Alzheimer’s to protecting against colon cancer.

Ingredients:
2 apples, thinly sliced
4 cinnamon sticks
2 quarts water/seltzer, divided
ice
sliced apple and cinnamon sticks, for serving

Directions:
Place the thinly sliced apples and cinnamon sticks in a pitcher. For still infused water, add 2 quarts of water. For sparkling water, add 1 quart of seltzer during prep and a second quart just before serving. Refrigerate 2 to 4 hours to allow the ingredients to infuse. Stir well and strain, discarding the solids. For serving, add fresh apples and cinnamon sticks for garnish and plenty of ice. The infused water will keep refrigerated for up to 2 days.


Strawberries and Basil Water

This pretty medley of strawberries and basil from provides iron from the herb and vitamin C from the berries, which has been linked to fighting cancer, keeping wrinkles at bay, and more.

Ingredients:
1 pint strawberries, sliced
10 fresh basil leaves, torn
1 lemon, sliced
2 quarts water

Directions:
Combine strawberries, basil and lemon in a large pitcher. Add 2 quarts of water. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours or up to 2 days.


Blueberries, Peach, Lemon, and Mint Water

This supercharged mixture from combines the antioxidant power of the fruit with refreshing mint, a carotene-rich aromatic herb.

Ingredients:
1 large pitcher of water
10-12 chopped mint leaves
1 cup blueberries (frozen or fresh)
2 sliced lemons
1 sliced peach or nectarine

Throw everything together in a pitcher and let it steep overnight. You can use fresh or frozen fruit – I always prefer fresh if it’s in season.


Orange & Vanilla Infused Water

This light delicious water provides both vitamin C and a boost of antioxidants.

Ingredients:
2 litres of filtered water
1 orange, sliced
½ teaspoon vanilla extract or a scraped vanilla bean

Directions:
Combine the orange slices, vanilla and water in a large pitcher, and mix well. Allow to infuse in the fridge for at least an hour, and then keep chilled in the fridge for a refreshing beverage anytime you like!


Blackberries and Sage Water

Blackberries are brimming with fibre and heart-healthy polyunsaturated fats, while sage contains vitamin A and a variety of minerals like calcium and iron.

Ingredients:
5 sage leaves
1 cup blackberries (fresh or frozen)
ice
water

Directions:
Add sage leaves to a pitcher and bruise with a muddler. Add blackberries; press and twist with muddler to release their juices. Fill the jar with ice cubes, and then add water to the top, stir, cover and refrigerate.


Cucumber Slices and Lemongrass Water

Send yourself to the spa with this Thai inspired water. The lemongrass provides vitamins a and c, and the cucumber is a great diuretic!

Ingredients:
½ cucumber
1 stalk lemongrass
4 cups of water
ice

Directions:
Wash the cucumber. Using a vegetable peeler remove some of the waxy peel from the cucumber. Proceed to peel the cucumber into ribbons using the vegetable peeler. Put the ribbons into the pitcher.

Using your hands, peel away the rough outer edge of the lemongrass. Cut the lemongrass in half, lengthwise. Place the lemongrass onto a cutting board. Using a rolling pin, gently smash the lemongrass. Add to the pitcher of ice and cucumber ribbons. Fill with water. Give a stir. Let chill in the fridge at least an hour. Fill about ¼ of the pitcher with ice, stir, and enjoy.

Steak Tartare

Steak tartare

So to round out the end of our look at some raw dishes, how about the classic steak tartare? So I did a little digging into the background on this dish. I had always thought it had something to do with the Tatar people of Central Asia, and how they were so fierce in battle that they didn’t take time to cook their meat, they would just travel with it under their saddles so that the meat was tenderised enough by riding that it could just be eaten raw between bouts of fighting. Apparently this is a kitchen urban legend and the dish really has nothing to do with them at all.

Now here is where it gets a little confusing. The original recipe, which was quite popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries, was served “à la tartare” or “with tartar sauce”, and really wasn’t anything like our modern day steak tartare. In the early 20th century, they came out with a variation on this recipe called “Steack à l’Americaine” which resembled what we are more familiar with, raw ground beef and raw egg. Over time, the distinction between the two dishes disappeared, with the name from one and the recipe from the other sticking around.

Ingredients

2 pounds trimmed beef rib-eye roast
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 egg yolks
⅓ cup canola oil
6 tablespoons salt-packed capers, rinsed, drained, and minced
3 tablespoons minced parsley*
1 ¾ tablespoons Worcestershire sauce**
½ teaspoon hot sauce, such as Tabasco
5-6 cornichons, minced
1 small yellow onion, minced
kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
french fries, for serving
mixed salad greens, for serving*
toast points, melba toast, crackers, for serving

* Click here to learn how to properly clean parsley and salad greens.
** Click here to learn about using Worcestershire sauce with meat.

Directions:

Place beef in the freezer to firm, about 30 minutes; this will make it easier to chop finely. Meanwhile, whisk mustard and egg yolks in a large bowl; while whisking constantly, slowly pour in oil to create a mayonnaise.

Add capers, parsley, Worcestershire, hot sauce, cornichons, and onion, and season with salt and pepper; refrigerate flavourings until ready to use.

Remove beef from freezer and cut into ¼ inch cubes. Transfer beef to bowl of flavourings and stir to combine. Keep beef mixture chilled until ready to serve.

To serve, divide beef mixture into 4 to 6 equal portions, and shape each into an oval disk, or you can get fancy and use a cookie cutter or tin to shape your tartare. Serve immediately with toast points, crackers, fries and greens.

Carpaccio

Carpacio

Picking up where we left off, Carpaccio is the international name of a typical Italian dish made with raw meat. Unlike some of the other raw dishes such as sushi, poke or ceviche, carpaccio is a fairly recent culinary invention. The dish was proposed with this name for the first time in Venice, at the time of an exhibition dedicated to Venetian painter Vittore Carpaccio which took place in 1963.

The dish, based on the Piedmont speciality “Carne Cruda all’Albese”, was invented and popularised by Giuseppe Cipriani, founder of Harry’s Bar in Venice. He originally prepared the dish for the countess Amalia Nani Mocenigo when he learned that the doctors had recommended that she eat raw meat. The dish was named carpaccio after Vittore Carpaccio, the Venetian painter known for the characteristic red and white tones of his work.

The meat typically used for carpaccio is beef sirloin, which unfortunately cannot be used in a kosher dish. For our recipe, we will be using very thinly sliced Rib Eye Roast. You can always speak with your butcher about what they would recommend using. Just make sure to tell them that you will be serving the meat raw. They might even do you a favour and slice it for you!

Ingredients:

2-2 ½ pounds rib eye roast
1 (5 ounce box) fresh baby arugula*
½ cup extra virgin olive oil, divided
salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed juice from about 2 lemons
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 egg yolk
10 small tomatoes cut into quarters to garnish

* Click here to learn how to clean arugula.

Directions:

Wrap the roast in plastic wrap, and chill in the freezer for 1 hour. Using a very sharp knife, cut the beef against the grain into ⅛ inch thick slices. Place the slices between sheets of plastic wrap or wax paper and gently pound with the flat end of a meat mallet, or roll with a heavy rolling pin until paper thin.

Arrange the slices on 6 individual chilled plates. Add the arugula to a bowl and toss with 4 tablespoons of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Arrange the arugula in a pile in the centre of each plate.

Place the remaining 4 tablespoons oil, lemon juice, mustard, egg yolk, salt and pepper in a bowl and using an immersion blender or hand blender to mix until thick. Drizzle the mustard sauce around each plate avoiding the arugula. Garnish the plates with the tomato quarters and serve immediately.

Hawaiian Poke

Tuna & Avocado Poke

So has anyone else noticed that it got pretty hot out? Like really quickly too? Whatever happened to Spring? It seems that here in Toronto we get, usually, a pretty wicked Winter, a week of Spring, and then watch out, ’cause here comes Summer! And with that, comes the heat and the dreaded humidity. Some days it feels more like you’re swimming outside rather than walking. So, having said all of that, how about some recipes that you don’t have to “cook”? No heat required? That’s right, we’re doing a raw week!

Today’s recipe is for Poke, a traditional Hawaiian dish that combines the freshest of fish, usually either tuna or octopus, with some asian flavours such as soy, sesame and onion. The trick to this dish is not to make it too much in advance. You want to combine the flavours just before eating, only about 15-30 minutes before everyone comes to the table. This way you don’t loose the fresh, delicate taste of the fish. My suggestion? Try serving this as a starter one Shabbos instead of gefilte fish! It will be a hit!

Ingredients:

½ pound sushi-grade salmon
½ pound sushi-grade ahi tuna
1 large avocado, cubed
4 green onions/scallion, thinly sliced*
½ jalapeno chili, thinly sliced (optional)
1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
¼ cup low-sodium soy sauce
2 tablespoons white sugar
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 ½ teaspoons lime juice
½ tsp ground ginger
salt and pepper to taste
cooked white rice, to serve

* Click here to learn how to clean green onions/scallions.

Directions:

Check over your fish for any small bones or pieces of skin left on. Using a very sharp knife, slice the fish into ½” cubes. Set your fish aside for now. To toast your sesame seeds, heat a dry skillet over medium heat. Add the sesame seeds, and cook until toasted and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Make sure to stir often to prevent burning.

In a medium bowl, mix together the green onions/scallions, jalapeno, toasted sesame seeds, soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil, lime juice and ginger. Save a little onion and sesame seeds to top your finished poke. Add the fish and avocado to the bowl with the marinade, and toss to coat.

Fill a large bowl with ice, and then place the bowl with the poke in it into the larger ice filled bowl to keep the poke nice and fresh until you are ready to serve it. Taste the poke, and adjust the seasoning as needed, with salt and pepper to your own taste.

Serve the poke on top of some cooked white rice with thinly sliced green onions and a sprinkling of sesame seeds. Enjoy!

Potato Kugel

Potato Kugel

Potatoes are a fresh vegetable, and they seriously deserve a place on your plate. You should know that one medium potato with the skin on is:

  1. naturally fat-free and sodium-free!
  2. has only 110 calories!
  3. Contains 45% of the daily value for vitamin C!
  4. Is packed with as much or more potassium (620 mg) than bananas, spinach, or broccoli!
  5. Provides 10 percent of the daily value of B6; and trace amounts of thiamin, riboflavin, folate, magnesium, phosphorous, iron, and zinc!

Of course all of that changes once we start adding the sour cream, the butter, and in the Ashkenazi tradition, make today’s recipe for potato kugel! Let’s not worry about the calories in this one and just enjoy! Besides, don’t you know that everything that you consume on Shabbos gets absorbed by the extra spirit that Hashem gives you during this holy time? All the joy, none of the guilt! Good Shabbos Everyone!

Ingredients:

5 large potatoes
1 small onion
5 eggs, beaten
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon chicken soup mix
¼ teaspoon pepper
1 stick of margarine, melted
paprika

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Using a food processor or grater, shred the potatoes and onion. Mix all of the ingredients together in a large bowl, and pour into a greased 9 x 13 inch pan. Sprinkle the top with a bit of paprika. Bake for 1 hour at 350 degrees, until browned and crisp on top and the kugel is set.

* Note: If doubling this recipe – Double all of the ingredients except for the margarine. Keept that at 1 stick (1/2 cup).

Colcannon

Colcannon

When looking back in history, you don’t often hear about great famines or blights being brought about by a single type of vegetation, but the potato did just that. In Ireland between 1845 and 1852, the potato crop was devastated by a fungus known as “potato blight” or Phytophthora infestans. At the time, the peasantry of Ireland was very dependent upon the potato. The “Great Potato Famine,” caused a million deaths and another million emigrations (many to the U.S.). This caused the population of Ireland to drop by 20 to 25% during this period.

The potato remained Ireland’s staple crop after the famine and by the end of the 19th century, the Irish per capita consumption of four pounds a day was the highest in the world.  Because of their history and their first-hand experience Ireland has been at the forefront of international famine relief. In 1985 Bob Geldof, Irish rock star and founder of Live Aid, revealed that the people of Ireland had given more to his fundraising efforts per head of population than any other nation in the world. In 2000, Bono, lead singer with Irish band U2, played a central role in campaigning for debt relief for African nations in the Jubilee 2000 campaign. The Irish famine experience continues to influence many Irish people in their attitudes towards the developing world and famine victims everywhere. It is good to see that tragedy can turn into triumph, and bring about positive change in the world.

Ingredients:

6 medium/large yukon gold potatoes, peeled and quartered
2-3 tablespoons butter/margarine, divided
2 leeks, sliced (white and light green parts only)*
4 green onions/scallions, sliced*
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 head savoy cabbage, shredded*
2 ½ cups water, divided
3-4 cups green kale, washed, stalks removed and shredded*
salt & pepper

* Click here to learn how to clean cabbage, kale and green onions/scallions, and leeks.

Directions:

Boil the potatoes until tender. Drain the potatoes, saving about a cup of the cooking liquid. Mash the potatoes, adding salt, pepper, a little butter/margarine to taste, and as much of the cooking liquid as needed to make the potatoes fluffy.

While the potatoes are cooking put 1 tablespoon of butter/margarine in a deep skillet and sauté the leeks, green onions/scallions and garlic until everything is translucent, about 7-10 minutes, over medium heat. Add the savoy cabbage and ½ cup of water, then cover the pan and cook until the cabbage is tender.

In another skillet add the remaining water and cook the kale until tender, about 4-5 minutes. Drain the kale well, and then mix everything together, and taste to adjust your seasonings. Serve and enjoy!

Gnocchi in a Brown Butter Sage Sauce

Gnocchi with Brown Butter Sage Sauce

If potatoes had a hero, it would be Antoine-Augustin Parmentier. Born in France in 1737, he is most remembered for being a vocal promoter of the potato as a food source for humans in France and throughout Europe.

While serving as a French Army pharmacist during the Seven Years’ War, he was captured by the Prussians and imprisoned. Forced to eat potatoes, known to him at that point only has hog feed, he began to experiment and see the value to this small stubby root.

As a way to get the public interested in the vegetable, he conducted a series of publicity stunts, including hosting dinners at which potato dishes featured prominently and guests included luminaries such as Benjamin Franklin and Antoine Lavoisier, giving bouquets of potato blossoms to the King and Queen, and surrounding his potato patch at Sablons with armed guards to suggest valuable goods — then instructing them to accept any and all bribes from civilians and withdrawing them at night so the greedy crowd could “steal” the potatoes.

I guess you could say his techniques worked, as potatoes are not only acceptable, and as more than just hog feed, but are a staple in kitchens around the world. Today’s recipe will show you how Italians make quick work out of a bag of spuds!

Ingredients:

Gnocchi:
6 large baking potatoes (about 3 ½ pounds), scrubbed
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons salt + salt for boiling water
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
pinch of nutmeg
1-2 tablespoons olive oil
4 cups all-purpose flour, or as needed

Brown Butter Sage Sauce:
¼ cup butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
1-2 cloves garlic, minced
8-10 sage leaves*
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ cup grated parmesan cheese
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese

* Click here to learn how to clean sage.

Directions:

Gnocchi:
Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Drop in potatoes and cook until tender but still firm, about 15-20 minutes. Drain, cool slightly, and peel. Season the potatoes with salt, pepper and nutmeg, then mash the potatoes with a fork, masher, or in a ricer. Place the mashed potatoes in a large mixing bowl, and stir in the eggs and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Knead in enough flour to make a soft dough. If the dough is too dry, add some more oil, too moist, add some more flour.

On a floured surface, roll dough into a long rope. Cut the rope into ½ inch pieces. Take each piece and roll it against the back of fork, along the tines. This will give you’re the classic ribbed shape of the gnocchi dumpling.

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Drop in gnocchi, one by one, and cook until they float to the top, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Sauce:
Melt the butter in a skillet over medium heat. With a slotted spoon, remove any foam that rises off of the butter. Let the butter start to get a little colour to it. Remove it from the heat, and add the olive oi. Return the pan to the heat and stir in the garlic, and cook until the garlic has softened and is beginning to turn golden brown, about 4 minutes.

Stir in the sage and salt for a few seconds, and then add the cooked gnocchi. Toss gently with ¼ cup of parmesan cheese and the pepper. Sprinkle with the remaining parmesan cheese to serve.

Papas Arrugadas with Red & Green Mojo Sauce

Canarian Potatoes

The humble potato. Where would be without it? As a Jew just coming off of Passover, I can tell you I’d be lost without it! So in honour of our starchy, tuberous friend from the nightshade family, I dedicate this week to the ever versatile potato!

We’re going to be starting our international dedication with a recipe from the Canary Islands, which are Spanish territory just off the southern coast of Morocco. It is fitting to choose a recipe with Spanish roots, since the English word potato comes from the Spanish patata (the name used in Spain).  The Spanish say that patata is derived from the Taíno (native language of the people of the Caribbean) batata and the Quechua (native language of the people of the Andes) papa. So as you can see, even the name is international!

This recipe makes a great little appetizer if you’re serving a tapas style meal or hors d’oeuvres and wine, as something savoury to nibble on! Enjoy!

Ingredients:

For the green mojo sauce:
½ green bell pepper, cut into large pieces
½ cup cilantro or parsley leaves*
2 garlic cloves, or to taste, crushed to a paste
¼ to ½ teaspoon ground cumin
1 ½ tablespoons white wine vinegar
pinch of fine sea salt, or to taste
½ cup extra virgin olive oil

For the red mojo sauce:
4 garlic cloves, or to taste, crushed to a paste
¾ teaspoon pimentón picante, chile pepper, or cayenne
2 teaspoons pimentón dulce or sweet paprika
¼ teaspoon ground cumin
6 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons white or red wine vinegar
pinch of fine sea salt, or to taste

For the potatoes:
2 pounds small new potatoes (in their skins), washed
4 tablespoons coarse sea salt

* Click here to learn how to clean cliantro and parsely.

Directions:

To make the green mojo sauce:
Blend all the ingredients except the oil to a paste in the food processor. Gradually add the oil and blend to a light creamy consistency.

To make the red mojo sauce:
Mix the garlic with the pimentón, and cumin in a bowl, then beat in the olive oil and vinegar. Add salt to taste.

To cook the potatoes:
Put the potatoes in a large saucepan that holds them in one layer, and add just enough water to cover and the salt. If you have to boil the potatoes in two pans, do so, this way they each get the salty coating.

Bring the salty water to a boil and cook, uncovered, over medium heat, letting the water bubble for 25 minutes, or until the potatoes are very tender and the water has evaporated. Leave them over very low heat for a few minutes, moving them and turning them over in the dry pan, until they are wrinkled and covered with a fine powder of salt. Serve hot or warm, with one or both of the sauces.

Profiteroles

Profiteroles

So we’ve now come to the end of another week of Victorian recipes and a Victorian meal. Are you as full as I am? Amongst the many desserts and vegetable dishes (I’m not quite sure why they were listed under the sweets portion of the menu), the Queen was served “Les Choux glacés à la Duchesse” which translates to “Iced Puff Pastries” or in my mind “Profiteroles”. Now no matter how you slice it, whether with the Victorian version of the recipe:

Les Choux glacés à la Duchesse

Or the modern day recipe that I have below, I will fully admit that this is not one of those “Shake-and-Bake” recipes where you can blink and be done with it. It’s got steps, lots of them, and it’s a wee bit finicky and pain-staking. Having made it sound like oh so much fun, I can say one thing for it… it’s delicious and super-duper impressive! Especially if you make a tower out of them. Have a mother-in-law you want to impress? This will do it! You can try making this dish with non-dairy ingredients, replacing the butter with margarine and the milk with soy/almond/cashew milk, but I’m not 100% sure how well it will come out.

Ingredients:

Choux Pastry:
½ cup water
½ cup milk
1/3 cup unsalted butter
1 teaspoon sugar
¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup all-purpose flour
4 eggs

Vanilla Pastry Cream:
4 egg yolks
2 cups milk
¾ cup sugar
¼ cup cornstarch
1 teaspoon vanilla

Chocolate Glaze:
60 g (1/3 cup or 2.1 oz.) bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 teaspoons corn syrup

Directions:

Choux Pastry:
In medium sized sauce pan, bring the water, milk, butter, sugar and salt to boil over medium-high heat until the butter is melted. Using wooden spoon, stir in flour until mixture forms ball and film forms on the bottom of the pan.

Cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Remove the pan from the heat, and continue to mix the pastry dough for another minute so that it can cool a bit. One at a time, beat in 3 of the eggs, beating well after each addition until the dough is smooth and shiny.

Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Using a piping bag fitted with a ½ inch plain tip or spoon, pipe (or spoon) the dough into twenty-four 1 ½ inch wide mounds on the prepared baking sheets. Whisk the remaining egg with 1 tablespoon of water; and using a pastry brush, brush the mixture over the mounds, gently flattening any peaks in dough.

Bake in 425°F oven until the mounds are puffed and golden, about 15 minutes. Reduce the heat to 375°F and bake until golden and crisp, about 10 more minutes. Turn off the oven, and let them stand in oven for another 15 – 25 minutes to dry.

Transfer the pastry mounds to a wire rack, and using the tip of a knife, poke hole in bottom of each profiterole. Let the pastry cool completely. (If you are making these ahead: Store in airtight container for up to 24 hours, then re-crisp in 350°F oven for 5 minutes, then cool again before filling.)

Vanilla Pastry Cream:
In bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, ½ cup of the milk, the sugar and cornstarch. In heavy-bottomed saucepan, heat the remaining milk over medium heat just until bubbles form around the edge. Gradually whisk the warmed milk into egg yolk mixture. Return the combined mixture to the saucepan and cook, whisking, until thick enough to coast the back of a spoon, about 5 minutes.

Strain the cream through a fine-mesh sieve into clean bowl, and then stir in the vanilla. Cover the bowl with some plastic wrap, laying the wrap directly on the surface of the cream (this way a skin doesn’t form). Refrigerate the cream until chilled, about 3 hours. (If you are making this ahead: Refrigerate in airtight container for up to 24 hours.)

Chocolate Glaze:
In heatproof bowl over a saucepan of hot (not boiling) water*, melt together the chocolate, butter and corn syrup, stirring until smooth. Remove from heat, leaving the bowl over the saucepan to keep warm.

* Click here to see my tips on using a double boiler.

Assembly:
Using a piping bag fitted with ¼ inch plain tip, pipe pastry cream into each profiterole through the hole in the bottom. Dip the tops of each into the glaze. Let each stand until set, about 20 minutes. (If you are making these ahead: Refrigerate them for up to 4 hours.)