Naturally Flavoured Waters

Flavoured Waters

So with Canada Day behind us, and the hot long summer ahead (sorry GOT fans, winter is not yet coming!), it is important that we stay hydrated! So this week is all about the liquids! And what better way to kick it off than with good ol’ H2O? That reminds me of a bad nerd joke, that you’ll have to forgive me for telling, but I just can’t help myself.

Two scientists walk into a bar. The first one says “I’ll have some H2O.” The second one says, “I’ll have some H2O too.” The second scientist then dies.

All my fellow nerds will get it, for those that don’t, H2O2 (too) is the chemical formula for Hydrogen Peroxide which can kill you if ingested. Hey, I warned you it was a bad joke, don’t shoot the blogger.

So having warmed up the crowd, let’s move on to some great, easy waters, and some of the benefits that they will bring you. Please check out our produce cleaning page to see how to clean all of the fresh produce and herbs used in these recipes. You can check out the page by clicking here.


Apples and Cinnamon Water

Cinnamon helps lower blood sugar concentration and improves insulin sensitivity, while apples have been shown in studies to help a wide spectrum of ailments from staving off Alzheimer’s to protecting against colon cancer.

Ingredients:
2 apples, thinly sliced
4 cinnamon sticks
2 quarts water/seltzer, divided
ice
sliced apple and cinnamon sticks, for serving

Directions:
Place the thinly sliced apples and cinnamon sticks in a pitcher. For still infused water, add 2 quarts of water. For sparkling water, add 1 quart of seltzer during prep and a second quart just before serving. Refrigerate 2 to 4 hours to allow the ingredients to infuse. Stir well and strain, discarding the solids. For serving, add fresh apples and cinnamon sticks for garnish and plenty of ice. The infused water will keep refrigerated for up to 2 days.


Strawberries and Basil Water

This pretty medley of strawberries and basil from provides iron from the herb and vitamin C from the berries, which has been linked to fighting cancer, keeping wrinkles at bay, and more.

Ingredients:
1 pint strawberries, sliced
10 fresh basil leaves, torn
1 lemon, sliced
2 quarts water

Directions:
Combine strawberries, basil and lemon in a large pitcher. Add 2 quarts of water. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours or up to 2 days.


Blueberries, Peach, Lemon, and Mint Water

This supercharged mixture from combines the antioxidant power of the fruit with refreshing mint, a carotene-rich aromatic herb.

Ingredients:
1 large pitcher of water
10-12 chopped mint leaves
1 cup blueberries (frozen or fresh)
2 sliced lemons
1 sliced peach or nectarine

Throw everything together in a pitcher and let it steep overnight. You can use fresh or frozen fruit – I always prefer fresh if it’s in season.


Orange & Vanilla Infused Water

This light delicious water provides both vitamin C and a boost of antioxidants.

Ingredients:
2 litres of filtered water
1 orange, sliced
½ teaspoon vanilla extract or a scraped vanilla bean

Directions:
Combine the orange slices, vanilla and water in a large pitcher, and mix well. Allow to infuse in the fridge for at least an hour, and then keep chilled in the fridge for a refreshing beverage anytime you like!


Blackberries and Sage Water

Blackberries are brimming with fibre and heart-healthy polyunsaturated fats, while sage contains vitamin A and a variety of minerals like calcium and iron.

Ingredients:
5 sage leaves
1 cup blackberries (fresh or frozen)
ice
water

Directions:
Add sage leaves to a pitcher and bruise with a muddler. Add blackberries; press and twist with muddler to release their juices. Fill the jar with ice cubes, and then add water to the top, stir, cover and refrigerate.


Cucumber Slices and Lemongrass Water

Send yourself to the spa with this Thai inspired water. The lemongrass provides vitamins a and c, and the cucumber is a great diuretic!

Ingredients:
½ cucumber
1 stalk lemongrass
4 cups of water
ice

Directions:
Wash the cucumber. Using a vegetable peeler remove some of the waxy peel from the cucumber. Proceed to peel the cucumber into ribbons using the vegetable peeler. Put the ribbons into the pitcher.

Using your hands, peel away the rough outer edge of the lemongrass. Cut the lemongrass in half, lengthwise. Place the lemongrass onto a cutting board. Using a rolling pin, gently smash the lemongrass. Add to the pitcher of ice and cucumber ribbons. Fill with water. Give a stir. Let chill in the fridge at least an hour. Fill about ¼ of the pitcher with ice, stir, and enjoy.

Gnocchi in a Brown Butter Sage Sauce

Gnocchi with Brown Butter Sage Sauce

If potatoes had a hero, it would be Antoine-Augustin Parmentier. Born in France in 1737, he is most remembered for being a vocal promoter of the potato as a food source for humans in France and throughout Europe.

While serving as a French Army pharmacist during the Seven Years’ War, he was captured by the Prussians and imprisoned. Forced to eat potatoes, known to him at that point only has hog feed, he began to experiment and see the value to this small stubby root.

As a way to get the public interested in the vegetable, he conducted a series of publicity stunts, including hosting dinners at which potato dishes featured prominently and guests included luminaries such as Benjamin Franklin and Antoine Lavoisier, giving bouquets of potato blossoms to the King and Queen, and surrounding his potato patch at Sablons with armed guards to suggest valuable goods — then instructing them to accept any and all bribes from civilians and withdrawing them at night so the greedy crowd could “steal” the potatoes.

I guess you could say his techniques worked, as potatoes are not only acceptable, and as more than just hog feed, but are a staple in kitchens around the world. Today’s recipe will show you how Italians make quick work out of a bag of spuds!

Ingredients:

Gnocchi:
6 large baking potatoes (about 3 ½ pounds), scrubbed
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons salt + salt for boiling water
½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
pinch of nutmeg
1-2 tablespoons olive oil
4 cups all-purpose flour, or as needed

Brown Butter Sage Sauce:
¼ cup butter
1 tablespoon olive oil
1-2 cloves garlic, minced
8-10 sage leaves*
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ cup grated parmesan cheese
¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese

* Click here to learn how to clean sage.

Directions:

Gnocchi:
Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Drop in potatoes and cook until tender but still firm, about 15-20 minutes. Drain, cool slightly, and peel. Season the potatoes with salt, pepper and nutmeg, then mash the potatoes with a fork, masher, or in a ricer. Place the mashed potatoes in a large mixing bowl, and stir in the eggs and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Knead in enough flour to make a soft dough. If the dough is too dry, add some more oil, too moist, add some more flour.

On a floured surface, roll dough into a long rope. Cut the rope into ½ inch pieces. Take each piece and roll it against the back of fork, along the tines. This will give you’re the classic ribbed shape of the gnocchi dumpling.

Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Drop in gnocchi, one by one, and cook until they float to the top, about 3 to 5 minutes.

Sauce:
Melt the butter in a skillet over medium heat. With a slotted spoon, remove any foam that rises off of the butter. Let the butter start to get a little colour to it. Remove it from the heat, and add the olive oi. Return the pan to the heat and stir in the garlic, and cook until the garlic has softened and is beginning to turn golden brown, about 4 minutes.

Stir in the sage and salt for a few seconds, and then add the cooked gnocchi. Toss gently with ¼ cup of parmesan cheese and the pepper. Sprinkle with the remaining parmesan cheese to serve.

Marinated Chicken in a Wine and Mushroom Cream Sauce with Kalamata Olives

Marinated Chicken in Wine Mushroom Cream Sauce

So we’re coming into the home stretch, sort of, of Queen Victoria’s Jubilee Dinner, as we are now on the relevés course. This came after the mains, but before the roasts and the sweets, not to mention the side table that was out, y’know just in case you got hungry between courses. Can you imagine? I’m sorry your Majesty, but the 9 dishes you had presented up until now haven’t quite hit the mark, I’m going to go make myself a cold roast beef sandwich? I definitely would have gone all Queen of Hearts on the subject and shouted “Off with their head!” to the ungrateful lout!

Speaking of off with their head, a chicken definitely lost theirs in the preparation of today’s recipe. “Les Poulets à la Financière” or “Chicken Garnished with Cocks’ Combs, Cocks’ Kidneys, Dumplings, Sweetbreads, Mushrooms, Olives and Truffles” was a pretty complex dish as you can tell by a partial recipe that I was able to find from the era:

Poulets à la Financière

I think the modern recipe below for chicken with mushrooms and olives might not only be easier, but will also be slightly more palatable! Enjoy!

Ingredients:

6 chicken leg quarters or 6 breasts (or whatever cuts your family likes)
olive oil (to brown chicken)

Marinade:
6 sprigs of fresh sage*
6 garlic cloves roughly chopped
1 teaspoon dried sage
1 ½ cups dry white wine
¾ cup pitted kalamata olives (roughly chopped)
Salt and pepper to taste

Mushroom Cream Sauce:
6 sage leaves roughly chopped*
4 garlic cloves (minced)
1 ½ cup dry white wine or chicken broth
3 cups of non-dairy creamer
3 pounds of crimini mushrooms (sliced)
¾ cup pitted kalamata olives
Salt and pepper to taste

* Click here to learn how to clean sage.

Directions:

Season the chicken with dried sage, salt, and pepper. Place the chicken in a covered container or large freezer bag with the wine, garlic, fresh sage and chopped olives. Marinate the chicken overnight, or longer, but no longer than 48 hours.

When you are ready to cook chicken, take the chicken out and let it sit for about 15 minutes. Bringing the chicken to room temperature will help the chicken to cook evenly. While you are waiting, preheat the oven to 375°F.

After the chicken has sat out for 15 minutes, put a little olive oil in a cast iron pan or other any oven safe pan you have. On your stove top heat the pan up on a medium heat. Once the oil is hot, add the chicken pieces, and evenly brown the chicken on both sides. Once you have browned the chicken, remove the chicken from the pan.

Now add the wine to the pan, deglazing it (removing all the delicious pieces of marinade from the bottom of the pan). Immediately after you add the wine, add the non-dairy creamer, mushrooms, sage, and garlic. Cook the sauce for a few minutes, giving the mushrooms a chance to absorb the sauce.

Then, add your chicken back in to the pan, along with the olives and taste for to see if salt or pepper is needed. Cover the pan and bake in the oven for 30 minutes, or until the chicken is fully cooked through.

Fagioli al l’uccelletto (Beans Braised in Tomato and Sage Sauce)

beans braised with tomato and sageIngredients:

1 (796ml) can cannellini beans
1 (796ml) can crushed tomatoes
3 – 5 cloves of garlic, peeled and slightly crushed
A few fresh sage leaves*
Salt and pepper
Olive oil

Directions:

Begin by making a simple tomato sauce: gently sauté a few garlic cloves and some fresh sage leaves in olive oil. When the garlic is just beginning to brown, add the canned tomatoes, and let it simmer, always on gentle heat, until the tomatoes have reduced nicely to a saucy consistency.

Add the cannellini beans, season with salt and peppers, and allow them to simmer in the tomato sauce for about 10 minutes or so, just long enough for them to absorb the flavor of the sauce. Test for seasoning, adjust if need be, and serve your fagioli all’uccelletto immediately.

* Click here to learn how to clean sage.