Pomegranate – רימון

On Rosh HaShannah we eat a pomegranate and say:

יְהִי רָצוֹן מִלְּפָנֶיךָ ה’ אֱלֹהינוּ וֵאלֵֹהי אֲבוֹתֵינוּ, שֶׁנִּהְיֶה מְלֵאִים מִצְוֹת כָּרִמּוֹן

May it be Your will, Lord our G-d and the G-d of our fathers, that we be filled with mitzvot like a pomegranate [is filled with seeds].

With 613 to choose from, I’m sure we can find a way to be filled with mitzvot and pomegranates this year!

Pom Dip

Pomegranate Pepper Dip

This version of muhammara, a Turkish dip made with red peppers, pomegranate molasses, and walnuts, uses fresh pomegranate seeds instead of reduced pomegranate molasses, and pecans instead of walnuts. It has a fresh, bright flavor and is delicious spread on crackers or pita bread or used as a dip for fresh or lightly steamed veggies.

Ingredients:

3 to 4 red bell peppers
1 pomegranate
1 to 1 ½ cups pecans
1 clove garlic
1 to 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
½ to 1 teaspoon sea salt
Fresh lemon juice to taste

Directions:

Use either the broiler method or live flame method, roast the red peppers until they are charred. Let them sit, covered, about 15 minutes. Heat an oven to 350°F. While it heats, seed the pomegranate and set the seeds aside. You should have about ¾ cup. Lay the pecans in a single layer on a baking sheet and put them in the oven. Cook until lightly toasted, about 10 minutes. Set a timer and check frequently – pecans can go from raw to burnt very quickly. Set pecans aside to cool. While the pecans cool, remove the skin from the peppers – the charred skin should slip right off. Feel free to rinse them under cool running water, if you like. Gently rub the pecans with a clean kitchen towel or paper towels and lift the pecans off the towels. You won’t remove all the pecans skin, nor do you need to, but it should remove a fair amount of it. Put the peppers, pecans, pomegranate seeds (save a few for garnish, if you like), garlic clove, olive oil, and salt in a blender or food processor and whirl until the mixture is creamy and smooth. Add lemon juice to taste and adjust salt to taste. Serve immediately or cover and chill to serve later (the dip will keep for several days). Garnish with reserved pomegranate seeds, if you like.

Pom Relish

Pomegranate Relish

Ingredients:

2 pomegranates, seeded (About 1 ½ cups of seeds)
1 ½ tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon grated lemon zest
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 ½ tablespoons orange juice
Dash of salt

Directions:

Seed pomegranates – see How to Seed a Pomegranate. Be careful because the juice does stain! Combine all ingredients and mix well with wooden spoon. Refrigerate for 4 hours prior to serving. Remove from the fridge about 15 minutes before serving so that it is not ice cold.

New Year’s Countdown – 2 Days To Go!

Pom New Year

One of the most popular symbols of the Jewish New Year is the pomegranate. This ruby red regal looking fruit, bearing it’s own crown, graces the tables of Jewish homes this time of year. Only recently though have we learned what nature has been trying to tell us all this time! The pomegranate is a major superfood! The antioxidant levels in pomegranate are some of the highest recorded for various fruits, even higher than blueberries. There is some speculation that the antioxidant properties of pomegranates may help lower blood pressure, reduce heart disease, and provide protection against cancer. So if the fact that they are delicious wasn’t reason enough, eat them for your heart and your health! Wishing you a happy and HEALTHY New Year!

Gourd – קרא

The Hebrew word for Gourd is קרא, which relates to the word קרע—meaning to rip apart, as well as קרא—to announce. So with this in mind, we eat a symbolic piece of gourd or squash, and ask that our evil deeds are ripped up and our good deeds proclaimed.

יְהִי רָצוֹן מִלְּפָנֶיךָ ה’ אֱלֹהינוּ וֵאלֵֹהי אֲבוֹתֵינוּ, שֶׁתִּקְרַע רוֹעַ גְּזַר דִּינֵנוּ, וְיִקָּרְאוּ לְפָנֶיךָ זָכִיּוֹתֵינוּ

May it be Your will, Lord our G‑d and the G‑d of our fathers, that the evil of our verdicts be ripped, and that our merits be announced before you.

Once all the ripping and shouting is done, enjoy these gourd recipes with your family!

Squash, Pomegrante, Farro Salad

Roasted Squash, Pomegranate and Farro Salad

Ingredients:

1 medium squash (meat and seeds)
1 cup farro
¼ cup pomegranate seeds
2 tablespoons green onions, chopped
1 ½ tablespoons olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste

Spices for Toasted Seeds:

¼ teaspoon olive oil
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon paprika
¼ teaspoon cumin
Pinch of black pepper

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees for roasting the squash. Half the squash lengthwise and scoop out the seeds, setting them aside for toasting later. Slice the halves into ¾ inch crescents, coat lightly with olive oil and season with salt. Roast on an aluminum-lined baking pan for about 30 minutes, turning halfway through.

As the squash roasts, boil 1 cup of farro in 3 cups of water. Once at a boil, turn down to a simmer and cover for 15 minutes until al dente. Drain the remaining water, and set aside in a large bowl to cool. Yield the seeds from the pomegranate by cutting off the stem, and scoring the pomegranate skin in quarters. Soak the scored pomegranate in water for a few minutes, before breaking it apart and seeding it under water. The pith with float to the surface of the water as you continue to agitate the seeds. Drain them and side them aside.

When the squash is done, allow it to cool almost completely before cutting it away from the skin and into cubes. Similar to the process for seeding the pomegranate, soak the squash seeds and pith in water, and agitate to separate the seeds. Discard as much of the pith as possible. Use the same pan to toast the seeds. Toss the seeds in the olive oil, salt, paprika, cumin, and pepper, then spread evenly on the aluminum foil. Toast in the oven for about 10 minutes, tossing halfway through.

When all the ingredients are prepared, toss together in a large bowl with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and chopped green onions. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

 

Roasted SquashRoasted Kabocha Squash with Fried Sage

Ingredients:

1 Kabocha squash (or acorn, butternut, etc.)
4 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon curry powder
1 tablespoon brown sugar
Salt and pepper, to taste

To Fry the Sage:

Ingredients:

1 bunch fresh sage
¼ cup olive oil
Coarse salt

Directions:

Pinch off leaves from sage. Heat oil in a small skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Fry 6–8 sage leaves at a time until crisp, 2–3 seconds. Transfer with a fork to paper towels and sprinkle generously with coarse salt. Prep and fry sage and set aside. You can learn how to clean sage here.

Next scrub the outside of the Kabocha squash and with a very sharp knife and someone who has some strong hands, carefully cut it in half and scoop out the seeds. Lay the squash halves on their flat side and again with a sharp knife and a strong person, cut them into wedges. Place squash on a foil lined baking sheet and drizzle with oil, salt, pepper, curry and dust the top with brown sugar. Roast in oven at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for a total of 30 minutes. Turn wedges over half way through. When done, top with salt and pepper and the fried sage.