Make-Ahead Bread Recipes

bread in a jar

Does it seem to you that no matter what time Shabbos starts, you always seem to be in a rush? It could start at 4:30 or 8:30 and you always seem to be caught in your 18 minutes! Here’s an idea, how about some quick make-ahead bread recipes? This way all of your ingredients are measured out, and you can dump and bake, and have a delicious loaf of bread, ready for your meal? Sounds good to me! Enjoy and have a Good Shabbos!


Beer Bread Mix

Ingredients:
3 cups all-purpose flour
4 ½ teaspoons baking powder
3 tablespoons sugar
1 ½ teaspoons salt

Measure all of the above ingredients into a re-sealable jar or bag, and seal, trying to get as much air out as possible. Attach a tag with the following instructions:

To Use Add:
1 (12 oz.) can beer (dark or light, but not “Lite”)

Preheat the oven to either 350°F or 400°F and grease a loaf pan(s). Combine the bread mix and beer and bake as follows: for 1 large loaf, bake at 350°F for 1 ¼ hours. For 2 small loaves, bake at 400°F for 45 minutes. Remove and let cool on racks.


California Cornbread Mix

Ingredients:
2 cups flour
½ cup cornmeal
½ cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
3 ½ tablespoons shortening

Measure all of the above ingredients into a re-sealable jar or bag, and seal, trying to get as much air out as possible. Attach a tag with the following instructions:

To Use Add:
2 eggs
1 cup milk
½ cup butter, melted

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Place the cornbread mix in a large mixing bowl and add the eggs, milk and butter. Blend until the mixture is smooth. Pour into a greased 8-inch baking pan and bake for 30 minutes, or divide into 12 greased muffin tin cups and bake for 15-22 minutes.


Focaccia Bread Mix

Ingredients:
1 package yeast
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 ½ teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
1 ½ teaspoons dried rosemary
1 ½ cups bread flour
½ teaspoon salt

Measure all of the above ingredients, except the yeast, into a re-sealable jar or bag, and seal, trying to get as much air out as possible. Keep the yeast in a separate small baggie, and then place this baggie in the larger container with the rest of the mix. Attach a tag with the following instructions:

To Use Add:
½ cup warm water
4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
Salt, dried herbs (optional)
pesto, for serving

First, remove the yeast packet from the top of the mix. Then in a large mixing bowl combine the water, 2 tablespoons of the oil, the yeast packet and half of the contents of the focaccia bread mix. Mix until smooth and blended, and then add the remaining half of the bread mix. Knead the dough until smooth, and then transfer to an oiled bowl, cover, and let rise until doubled, about 15-20 minutes.

Preheat oven to 425°F. Punch the dough down and roll into a 13 x 9-inch rectangle or on a pizza pie dish.  Using your fingers, press dimples into the dough, spaced every inch or so apart. Brush the dough with the remaining oil and sprinkle with salt and any other herbs you wish to add. Bake for 5 minutes, then pop any large air bubbles that may form with a fork, and continue baking until golden, about 8 more minutes. Remove from pan and serve warm with pesto.


Olive-Walnut Country Bread

Ingredients:
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 ½ teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon dried rosemary
1 cup chopped walnuts

Measure all of the above ingredients into a re-sealable jar or bag, and seal, trying to get as much air out as possible. Attach a tag with the following instructions:

To Use Add:
1 1/3 cups buttermilk (or 1 ¼ cup non-dairy milk + 4 teaspoons lemon juice, mixed)
1 egg, beaten
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup sliced Kalamata olives, drained
Olive oil

Pre-heat the oven to 375°F. Grease an 8-inch round cake pan or coat with non-stick vegetable cooking spray. In a large bowl, combine the buttermilk (or alternative), egg, 2 tablespoons oil and olives. Slowly add the jar contents until the dough holds together. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead gently for about 30 seconds, just long enough for the dough to become smooth rather than sticky. Do not over-handle the dough.

With floured hands, pat the dough into a round about 8 inches across and 2-inches high. Place in the prepared pan. With a sharp knife, cut a 1/2-inch deep “X” across the top of the loaf. Bake 45-50 minutes or until browned. Remove from the pan. Rub the outside of the loaf with olive oil. Place on rack to cool completely.

Alt Flours… Not Just for Hipsters

Alternative FloursWheat flour contains gluten which is the protein that strengthens and binds dough in baking. Because of this, when baking with wheat free flours you may need to source alternative binding agents. Wheat free recipes using flour substitutes usually have been carefully formulated to get the best possible result taking into account the problems associated with lack of wheat gluten, therefore substitution can be a risky experiment. If you try substitution, then be aware that you may get a failure, so don’t do it for the first time if cooking for an important occasion.

The flours listed below are alternatives to wheat flour. However it is important to be aware that there is no exact substitute for wheat flour, and recipes made with wheat free alternative flours will be different from those containing wheat. It’s always best to store flours in airtight containers, in a dark cool place to avoid them turning rancid.

Amaranth Flour
Amaranth flour is made from the seed of the Amaranth plant, which is a leafy vegetable. Amaranth seeds are very high in protein, which makes a nutritious flour for baking. Alternative names: African spinach, Chinese spinach, Indian spinach, elephants ear.

Arrowroot Flour
Arrowroot flour is ground from the root of the plant, and is very useful for thickening recipes. It is tasteless, and the fine powder becomes clear when it is cooked, which makes it ideal for thickening clear sauces.

Brown Rice Flour
Brown rice flour is heavier than its relative, white rice flour. It is milled from unpolished brown rice so it has a higher nutritional value than white, and as it contains the bran of the brown rice it has a higher fibre content. This also means that it has a noticeable texture, a bit grainy. It does have a slight nutty taste, which will sometimes come out in recipes depending on the other ingredients, and the texture will also contribute to a heavier product than recipes made with white rice flour. It is not often used completely on its own because of its heavier nature. Bulk buying is not recommended as it is better used when fresh, store in an airtight container.

Buckwheat Flour
Buckwheat flour is not, despite its name a form of wheat, buckwheat is actually related to rhubarb. The small seeds of the plant are ground to make flour. It has a strong nutty taste so is not generally used on its own in a recipe, as the taste of the finished product can be very overpowering, and a little bitter. Alternative names: beech wheat, kasha, saracen corn.

Chia Flour
Made from ground chia seeds. Highly nutritious, chia seeds have been labelled a “superfood” containing Omega 3, fibre, calcium and protein, all packed into tiny seeds. Also known as “nature’s rocketfuel” as many sportspeople and superathletes use it for enhanced energy levels during events. If chia flour isn’t readily available then put chia seeds in a processor and whizz up some. If used in baking, liquid levels and baking time may need to be increased slightly.

Chick Pea Flour (also known as Gram or Garbanzo Flour)
This is ground from chick peas and has a strong slightly nutty taste. It is not generally used on its own.

Cornflour
Cornflour is milled from corn into a fine, white powder, and is used for thickening recipes and sauces. It has a bland taste, and therefore is used in conjunction with other ingredients that will impart flavour to the recipe. It also works very well when mixed with other flours, for example when making fine batters for tempura. Some types of cornflour are milled from wheat but are labelled wheaten cornflour. Alternative name: cornstarch.

Cornmeal
Ground from corn. Heavier than cornflour, not generally interchangeable in recipes.

Hemp Flour
Made from ground hemp seeds it has a mild, nutty flavour. Needs to be refrigerated after opening.

Lupin Flour
Made from a legume in the same plant family as peanuts. High in protein and fibre, low in fat, but carries the same protein that causes allergic reactions/anaphylaxis to peanut or legumes, which makes it unsuitable for people with peanut or legume allergies e.g. soybeans.

Maize Flour
Ground from corn. Heavier than cornflour, not generally interchangeable in recipes.

Millet Flour
Comes from the grass family, and is used as a cereal in many African and Asian countries. It can be used to thicken soups and make flat breads and griddle cakes. Because it lacks any form of gluten it’s not suited to many types of baking.

Potato Flour
This flour should not be confused with potato starch flour. Potato flour has a strong potato flavour and is a heavy flour so a little goes a long way. Bulk buying is not recommended unless you are using it on a very regular basis for a variety of recipes as it does not have a very long shelf life.

Potato Starch Flour
This is a fine white flour made from potatoes, and has a light potato flavour which is undetectable when used in recipes. It’s one of the few alternative flours that keeps very well provided it is stored in an airtight jar, and somewhere cool and dark.

Quinoa Flour
Quinoa is related to the plant family of spinach and beets. It has been used for over 5,000 years as a cereal, and the Incas called it the mother seed. Quinoa provides a good source of vegetable protein and it is the seeds of the quinoa plant that are ground to make flour.

Sorghum Flour
Ground from sorghum grain, which is similar to millet. The flour is used to make porridge or flat unleavened breads. It is an important staple in Africa and India. This flour stores well under normal temperatures.

Soya Flour
Soya flour is a high protein flour with a nutty taste. It is not generally used on it’s own in recipes, but when combined with other flours is very successful as an alternative flour. Can be used to thicken recipes or added as a flavour enhancer. It needs to be carefully stored as it is a high fat flour and can go rancid if not stored properly. A cool, dark environment is recommended and can even be stored in the refrigerator.

Tapioca Flour
Tapioca flour is made from the root of the cassava plant, once ground it takes the form of a light, soft, fine white flour. Tapioca flour adds chewiness to baking and is a good thickener. Tapioca flour is an excellent addition to any wheat free kitchen. It’s a fairly resilient flour, so storing at room temperature is no problem.

Teff Flour
Teff comes from the grass family, and is a tiny cereal grain native to northern Africa. It is ground into flour and used to prepare injera, which is a spongy, slightly sour flat bread. It is now finding a niche in the health food market because it is very nutritious (see today’s quiche recipe!).

White Rice Flour
This flour is milled from polished white rice so it is very bland in taste, and not particularly nutritious. White rice flour is ideal for recipes that require a light texture. It can be used on its own for a variety of recipes and has a reasonable shelf life, as long as it is stored in an airtight container to avoid it absorbing moisture from the air.