Roasted Salmon with Rhubarb and Red Cabbage

Roasted Salmon with Rhubarb and Red Cabbage

Okay, after touting both the virtues and dangers of rhubarb, not to mention some delicious recipes, I don’t really have much more to say on the subject. But I will leave you with this one last bit of trivia: Did you know though not often used today, the word ‘rhubarb’ can also mean ‘a heated argument or dispute,’ according to Merriam Webster.But don’t get into a rhubarb about dinner, maybe try this dish out instead?

Ingredients:

4 teaspoons mustard seeds
1 ¼ cups orange juice
1 cup sugar
⅓ cup water
2 tablespoons finely grated orange peel*
4 teaspoons coriander seeds
1 tablespoon caraway seeds
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger*
3 cups 2-inch-long ¼ inch-thick matchstick-size strips rhubarb (from about 2-3 stalks trimmed rhubarb)
8 cups thinly sliced red cabbage** (from about ½ medium head)
½ cup Sherry wine vinegar
½ cup dry red wine
6 (6-7 ounce) salmon fillets with skin
2 tablespoons olive oil
3 cups arugula**
¾ cup plain Greek-style yogurt

* Click here to get tips on zesting oranges and peeling fresh ginger.
** Click here to learn how to clean arugula and cabbage.

Directions:

Stir the mustard seeds in a small dry skillet over medium heat until they begin to pop, about 3 minutes. Transfer them to small bowl and put aside for now.

Bring the orange juice, sugar, water, and orange peel to boil in large skillet, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Reduce the heat to medium and add the pre-cooked mustard seeds, coriander seeds, caraway seeds and ginger.

Simmer away until it becomes syrupy, about 10 minutes. Add the rhubarb and reduce the heat to medium-low. Cover and simmer until rhubarb is tender but intact, about 2-4 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the rhubarb to microwave-safe bowl and put it aside for now.

Bring syrup in skillet back up to a simmer and add the cabbage, vinegar, and wine, bringing everything up to a boil. Once it reaches a boil, reduce the heat back down to medium, partially cover, and simmer until cabbage is soft and most of liquid is absorbed, stirring frequently, for about 45 minutes. Season the cabbage to taste with salt and pepper. Remove the cabbage from the heat.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 425°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. Place the salmon, skin side down, on the prepared baking sheet. Brush the salmon with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Roast the salmon until it is just opaque in centre, about 11 minutes. Rewarm reserved rhubarb in microwave just until warm, about 1 minute or so.

Divide the warm cabbage among 6 plates. Scatter the arugula atop and around the cabbage. Place 1 salmon fillet atop the cabbage. Spoon a dollop of the yogurt atop the salmon, and then the rhubarb.

Israeli Hot Sauces – Zhug & Amba

So as we round out Condiment Week, I was trying to decide what today’s final recipe should be. We did the classics of mayo, mustard, ketchup and relish…. but what would be a good final note? So I thought to myself, what do you see on tables at restaurants? I know! Hot sauce! But no one is really going to make their own Tabasco or Texas Pete sauce at home (well, some people will, but most of us won’t).

But then I remembered one of my mom’s favourites! Amba! A slightly pickled, slightly spicy, savoury mango sauce that she just loves on her laffa! And of course, when you’re ordering up your laffa, you can always ask for it to be cha’reef (hot in Hebrew), which means the addition of Zhug, a spicy herb paste that really kicks it up a notch. So for today, we get two recipes, Amba and Zhug. Remember, you can always adjust the heat level by adding more or less chilies to the recipes. Enjoy and MAKE SURE TO WASH YOUR HANDS BEFORE TOUCHING YOUR EYES!

Zhug

Zhug – Israeli/Yemeni Hot Sauce
Makes about 1 ¼ cup

Ingredients:

10 to 14 fresh green chilies or jalapeños, seeded if you like and coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon sea salt
6 to 8 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon freshly ground caraway seeds
1 teaspoon freshly ground cumin seeds
½ teaspoon freshly ground green cardamom
1 cup coarsely chopped cilantro*
½ cup packed parsley leaves*
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 to 4 teaspoons fresh-squeezed lemon juice

* Click here to learn how to clean cilantro and parsley.

Directions:

Place the ingredients in the bowl of a food processor or in a blender and pulse several times, until you get a smooth paste. You will have to scrape down all the bits and pieces that stick to the sides of the bowl.

Pack in a jar and store in the refrigerator. Zhug will keep for one to two weeks. You can also freeze it, but it will lose some of its garlicky flavor.

Amba

Amba – Spicy/Savoury Israeli Condiment
Makes about 1 one-cup

Ingredients:

2 ½ green mangoes
1 ¼ tablespoons salt
½ tablespoon corn oil
2 ½ tablespoons mustard seeds
2 tablespoons cumin seed (whole, not ground)
1 tablespoon dried red pepper (about 2 ½ tiny ones, or more to taste)
½ tablespoon ground fenugreek
1 tablespoon hot paprika
½ tablespoon turmeric
½ head garlic, peeled and finely chopped (HEAD, not cloves)
¼ cup corn oil (more or less, for finishing)

Directions:

Wash the mangoes well and cut them up (including the peel) into slices the size of your pinky finger. Coat with the 1 ¼ tablespoons of salt, and place the slices into a large jar. Close the jar and shake it to evenly distribute the salt. Place the jar in a sunny spot for 4 to 5 days to release all the liquid in the fruit. At the end of this time the mangoes should be a very light, yellow colour.

Drain the mangoes, but make sure to save the liquid. Allow the mango slices to dry, preferably in the sun, for 3 to 4 hours. Heat the ½ tablespoon of corn oil in a pot, and add the mustard seeds, cumin seeds, peppers, fenugreek, paprika and turmeric. Cook and constantly stir for a few seconds, until the spices begin to pop and make tiny explosive noises.

In a separate small pot, boil the saved mango liquid and then add it to the heated spice mixture. Add the mango pieces and the chopped garlic. Stir, and continue cooking for 5 minutes on a low flame. Make sure the mixture does not dry out too much. Remove from the flame and let cool completely. At this point you can leave it chunky, or use a blender to purée it smooth.

Pour the mixture into a clean container with a lid and cover with the remaining corn oil, and then seal. The amba will keep in the fridge for at least six months.

Hawayej Spice Blend

Hawayej Spice BlendHawayej, also spelled Hawaij or Hawayij, is the name given to a variety of Yemeni ground spice mixtures used primarily for soups and coffee. Hawayej is used extensively by Yemenite Jews in Israel and its use has spread more widely into Israeli cuisine as a result.

The basic mixture for soup is also used in stews, curry-style dishes, rice and vegetable dishes, and even as a barbecue rub. It is made from cumin, black pepper, turmeric and cardamom. More elaborate versions may include ground cloves, caraway, nutmeg, saffron, coriander and ground dried onions. The Adeni version is made of cumin, black pepper, cardamom and coriander.

The mixture for coffee is made from aniseed, fennel seeds, ginger and cardamom. Although it is primarily used in brewing coffee, it is also used in desserts, cakes and slow-cooked meat dishes. In Aden, the mixture is made with ginger, cardamom, cloves, and cinnamon for black coffee, and when used for tea excludes the ginger.

Yield: Makes about 1 cup

Ingredients:

⅓ cup caraway seeds (generous 1 ounce)
⅓ cup cumin seeds (about 1 ounce)
⅓ cup coriander seeds (about 1 ounce)
3 tablespoons cardamom seeds (about ½ ounce)
1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns
4 whole cloves
3 tablespoons coarse kosher salt
3 tablespoons ground turmeric

Directions:

Lightly toast the first six ingredients in a skillet over medium heat for 1-2 minutes until fragrant. Be careful not to let them burn! Pour the toasted seeds and spices into a bowl, and allow them to cool. In batches, place the cooled seeds and spices in a coffee or spice grinder along with the salt and turmeric. Pulse the grinder in long, slow pulses to grind the seeds into a powdery spice mix, stirring inside the grinder periodically to evenly distribute the seeds. It may take a few minutes for the spices to reach the desired powdery texture. Store spice blend in an airtight container in a cool, dry pantry. Note: This can be made 1 month ahead.

Toasting and grinding the whole spices provides a fresher flavor than using pre-ground spices. However, if you already have ground spices and you don’t want to spend more money on whole spices, you may substitute ⅓ the amount of ground spice to 1 whole seed spice.