Steak Tartare

Steak tartare

So to round out the end of our look at some raw dishes, how about the classic steak tartare? So I did a little digging into the background on this dish. I had always thought it had something to do with the Tatar people of Central Asia, and how they were so fierce in battle that they didn’t take time to cook their meat, they would just travel with it under their saddles so that the meat was tenderised enough by riding that it could just be eaten raw between bouts of fighting. Apparently this is a kitchen urban legend and the dish really has nothing to do with them at all.

Now here is where it gets a little confusing. The original recipe, which was quite popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries, was served “à la tartare” or “with tartar sauce”, and really wasn’t anything like our modern day steak tartare. In the early 20th century, they came out with a variation on this recipe called “Steack à l’Americaine” which resembled what we are more familiar with, raw ground beef and raw egg. Over time, the distinction between the two dishes disappeared, with the name from one and the recipe from the other sticking around.

Ingredients

2 pounds trimmed beef rib-eye roast
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
2 egg yolks
⅓ cup canola oil
6 tablespoons salt-packed capers, rinsed, drained, and minced
3 tablespoons minced parsley*
1 ¾ tablespoons Worcestershire sauce**
½ teaspoon hot sauce, such as Tabasco
5-6 cornichons, minced
1 small yellow onion, minced
kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
french fries, for serving
mixed salad greens, for serving*
toast points, melba toast, crackers, for serving

* Click here to learn how to properly clean parsley and salad greens.
** Click here to learn about using Worcestershire sauce with meat.

Directions:

Place beef in the freezer to firm, about 30 minutes; this will make it easier to chop finely. Meanwhile, whisk mustard and egg yolks in a large bowl; while whisking constantly, slowly pour in oil to create a mayonnaise.

Add capers, parsley, Worcestershire, hot sauce, cornichons, and onion, and season with salt and pepper; refrigerate flavourings until ready to use.

Remove beef from freezer and cut into ¼ inch cubes. Transfer beef to bowl of flavourings and stir to combine. Keep beef mixture chilled until ready to serve.

To serve, divide beef mixture into 4 to 6 equal portions, and shape each into an oval disk, or you can get fancy and use a cookie cutter or tin to shape your tartare. Serve immediately with toast points, crackers, fries and greens.

Carpaccio

Carpacio

Picking up where we left off, Carpaccio is the international name of a typical Italian dish made with raw meat. Unlike some of the other raw dishes such as sushi, poke or ceviche, carpaccio is a fairly recent culinary invention. The dish was proposed with this name for the first time in Venice, at the time of an exhibition dedicated to Venetian painter Vittore Carpaccio which took place in 1963.

The dish, based on the Piedmont speciality “Carne Cruda all’Albese”, was invented and popularised by Giuseppe Cipriani, founder of Harry’s Bar in Venice. He originally prepared the dish for the countess Amalia Nani Mocenigo when he learned that the doctors had recommended that she eat raw meat. The dish was named carpaccio after Vittore Carpaccio, the Venetian painter known for the characteristic red and white tones of his work.

The meat typically used for carpaccio is beef sirloin, which unfortunately cannot be used in a kosher dish. For our recipe, we will be using very thinly sliced Rib Eye Roast. You can always speak with your butcher about what they would recommend using. Just make sure to tell them that you will be serving the meat raw. They might even do you a favour and slice it for you!

Ingredients:

2-2 ½ pounds rib eye roast
1 (5 ounce box) fresh baby arugula*
½ cup extra virgin olive oil, divided
salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons freshly squeezed juice from about 2 lemons
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 egg yolk
10 small tomatoes cut into quarters to garnish

* Click here to learn how to clean arugula.

Directions:

Wrap the roast in plastic wrap, and chill in the freezer for 1 hour. Using a very sharp knife, cut the beef against the grain into ⅛ inch thick slices. Place the slices between sheets of plastic wrap or wax paper and gently pound with the flat end of a meat mallet, or roll with a heavy rolling pin until paper thin.

Arrange the slices on 6 individual chilled plates. Add the arugula to a bowl and toss with 4 tablespoons of olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Arrange the arugula in a pile in the centre of each plate.

Place the remaining 4 tablespoons oil, lemon juice, mustard, egg yolk, salt and pepper in a bowl and using an immersion blender or hand blender to mix until thick. Drizzle the mustard sauce around each plate avoiding the arugula. Garnish the plates with the tomato quarters and serve immediately.