Copycat Recipes – Famous Breads!

So one of the downsides of keeping kosher, is that you do not get to partake in the wide world of non-kosher eating establishments, and some of their notoriously, good and addictive dishes. This week I thought I would track down some famous restaurant recipes and get you as close a copycat recipe as possible so that you could make them at home, kosherizing where needed.

I thought I’d start like you would if you were actually dining in one of these restaurants, and get you some of their delicious bread recipes that for those that keep kosher could only previously dream and drool about. You will notice that several of these recipes are in fact dairy. You can read up about the ins and outs of dairy bread here, or you can make these breads non-dairy, or pareve, by replacing the milk and butter with non-dairy alternatives, such as soy milk and margarine.

For the “Olive Garden” Bread Sticks, if you wish to make them non-dairy, change the butter to margarine and leave out the Parmesan cheese altogether. The only recipe that I would not suggest changing would be the “Red Lobster” Cheddar Bay Biscuits, as the non-dairy cheese alternatives do not tend to melt the same way that regular cheese does, but you can always try!


“Texas Roadhouse” Rolls Texas Roadhouse Rolls

Ingredients:
1 cup warm milk (100°F)
2 ¼ teaspoons active dry yeast
⅓ cup sugar
3 ½ cups all-purpose flour, plus more for the board
1 egg
⅓ cup butter, melted plus ¼ cup butter, melted (optional)
1 teaspoon salt

Honey Cinnamon Butter:
½ cup softened butter (salted butter)
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons honey
2 tablespoons powdered sugar

Directions:
In a cup or small bowl, stir together the warm milk, sugar, and yeast. Allow the yeast to proof and begin to activate while you prepare the other ingredients. Using a stand mixer or food processor, combine the flour, egg, ⅓ cup melted butter, and salt. Add the milk mixture and process until you have a smooth dough; it will be stickier and wetter than regular bread dough. Place the dough in a greased bowl, turn the dough to grease all sides, and cover with a towel. Let rise until it has doubled in size.

When the dough has doubled, punch it down and turn it out on a floured board. Let rest for 10 minutes. Roll out the dough into a large, flat rectangle approximately ½ inch thick. Cut into 16 portions with a sharp knife and place on a greased baking sheet and let rise again, until doubled. Preheat oven to 375°F. Bake the rolls for 10 minutes on the greased baking sheet. They will be light brown when removed from the oven. If desired you can brush the tops of the rolls with the remaining ¼ cup melted butter before serving.

Prepare honey cinnamon butter by combining butter, cinnamon, honey, and powdered sugar until well blended.


Olive Garden Breadsticks“Olive Garden” Bread Sticks

Ingredients:
1 ½ cups warm water
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon yeast
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 ½ teaspoons salt
4 ½ cups flour + extra flour for dusting board

Buttery topping:
4 tablespoons butter melted
1 teaspoon garlic powder
2 tablespoons Parmesan cheese
⅛ teaspoon oregano

Directions:
Combine warm water, sugar, oil, and yeast in a large bowl of a mixer or a food processor. Add 4 ½ cups of flour and salt and process until the dough forms a nice uniform ball. Place dough in a bowl that has been sprayed with non-stick spray. Cover bowl with a towel and allow to rise in a warm place. When the dough has doubled in size (this should take about an hour) place dough on a well-floured board and roll out dough. Roll out dough into a large rectangle. Cut in half horizontally, and then cut vertical strips of dough about 1 ½ inches thick. Roll the strips of dough into sticks. Place dough on a greased baking sheet, and allow them to rise until they have doubled in size (this should take about 45 minutes). You should get between 20 and 24 bread sticks from this recipe.

Melt butter, and stir in Parmesan cheese and oregano. For best results rub the oregano between your fingers as you place it into the butter. This will help release the oils of the oregano and make it taste even better. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Just before baking bread sticks brush them with the butter. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until golden brown. Brush any left-over butter topping on these just before serving.


“KFC” Buttermilk BiscuitsKFC Buttermilk Biscuits

Ingredients:
2 ½ cups self-rising flour
1 cup buttermilk
½ cup chilled butter (you can use shortening)
2 tablespoons of butter melted (to top biscuits with)
2 ½ teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon cream of tartar

Directions:
Preheat your oven to 425°F. Cut butter into small cubes, if you use shortening chill it so you cut into small pieces. It is important to cut the butter into small pieces so it will make it easier to cut the butter into the flour. In a medium sized bowl combine self-rising flour, sugar, and cream of tartar. Add in cubed butter, and work butter into the flour until it reaches a large sand grained texture. Add buttermilk, and stir long enough to stir buttermilk into the dough.

On a floured surface turn dough out of the bowl, and shape flour into a round shape, use a rolling pin to gently roll out dough to about ¾ of an inch thick. Use a biscuit cutter to cut out biscuits and place on an ungreased cookie sheet. Brush tops of biscuits with the 2 tablespoons of melted butter. Bake biscuits for 12 to 15 minutes.


Red Lobster Cheddar Bay Biscuits“Red Lobster” Cheddar Bay Biscuits

Ingredients:
4 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons baking powder
1 ⅓ tablespoons powdered sugar
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon baking soda
6 tablespoons canola oil
1 cup cold water
1 ½ cups grated sharp cheddar cheese
½ cup (1 stick) butter
2 teaspoons dried parsley flakes
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning

Directions:
Preheat the oven to 350°F. Mix together the flour, baking powder, sugar, salt, and baking soda until combined. Slowly add the oil, until all the lumps are gone and the mixture takes on a uniform texture. To this add the water and the grated cheese. Pat or roll out the dough to ¾ inch thickness. Cut the biscuits with a cutter or drinking glass, and place in a baking pan. Bake for 8-10 minutes, until the tops are golden brown.

While the biscuits are baking, in a small saucepan, melt the butter together with the parsley, garlic powder, and Italian seasoning. After you remove the biscuits from the oven, brush the tops with the seasoned butter and serve immediately.


“Outback Steakhouse” Honey Wheat BreadOutback Steakhouse Honey Wheat Bread

Ingredients:
2 ½ cups warm water (100°-110°F)
¼ cup vegetable oil
½ cup honey
3 ½ cups whole-wheat flour
2 tablespoons cocoa
2 tablespoons active dry yeast
2 teaspoons instant coffee
1 teaspoon salt
2-3 cups bread flour
rolled oats (for dusting loaves)

Directions:
In the bowl of a stand mixer fitter with a dough hook, stir together water, oil, and honey until mixed well. Add wheat flour to water mixture. Add the cocoa, yeast, coffee, salt, and stir until blended. Allow mixture sit for 10 minutes.

Stir in bread flour, one cup at a time, until dough clings to hook and almost clears the sides of mixer, about 3-4 minutes. Cover bowl with greased plastic wrap. Allow dough to rise in the bowl until doubled, about 30-60 minutes. Divide into 2 pieces. Cover each piece with greased plastic wrap, and let dough rest for 5 minutes.

Shape pieces into loaves, and sprinkle with oats. Place each loaf in a greased 9 x 5 inch loaf pan. Let dough rise until doubled, about 30-60 minutes. Toward the end of the rising time, preheat oven to 350 F. Bake at for 30-40 minutes.

Make-Ahead Bread Recipes

bread in a jar

Does it seem to you that no matter what time Shabbos starts, you always seem to be in a rush? It could start at 4:30 or 8:30 and you always seem to be caught in your 18 minutes! Here’s an idea, how about some quick make-ahead bread recipes? This way all of your ingredients are measured out, and you can dump and bake, and have a delicious loaf of bread, ready for your meal? Sounds good to me! Enjoy and have a Good Shabbos!


Beer Bread Mix

Ingredients:
3 cups all-purpose flour
4 ½ teaspoons baking powder
3 tablespoons sugar
1 ½ teaspoons salt

Measure all of the above ingredients into a re-sealable jar or bag, and seal, trying to get as much air out as possible. Attach a tag with the following instructions:

To Use Add:
1 (12 oz.) can beer (dark or light, but not “Lite”)

Preheat the oven to either 350°F or 400°F and grease a loaf pan(s). Combine the bread mix and beer and bake as follows: for 1 large loaf, bake at 350°F for 1 ¼ hours. For 2 small loaves, bake at 400°F for 45 minutes. Remove and let cool on racks.


California Cornbread Mix

Ingredients:
2 cups flour
½ cup cornmeal
½ cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
3 ½ tablespoons shortening

Measure all of the above ingredients into a re-sealable jar or bag, and seal, trying to get as much air out as possible. Attach a tag with the following instructions:

To Use Add:
2 eggs
1 cup milk
½ cup butter, melted

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Place the cornbread mix in a large mixing bowl and add the eggs, milk and butter. Blend until the mixture is smooth. Pour into a greased 8-inch baking pan and bake for 30 minutes, or divide into 12 greased muffin tin cups and bake for 15-22 minutes.


Focaccia Bread Mix

Ingredients:
1 package yeast
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 ½ teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes
1 ½ teaspoons dried rosemary
1 ½ cups bread flour
½ teaspoon salt

Measure all of the above ingredients, except the yeast, into a re-sealable jar or bag, and seal, trying to get as much air out as possible. Keep the yeast in a separate small baggie, and then place this baggie in the larger container with the rest of the mix. Attach a tag with the following instructions:

To Use Add:
½ cup warm water
4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
Salt, dried herbs (optional)
pesto, for serving

First, remove the yeast packet from the top of the mix. Then in a large mixing bowl combine the water, 2 tablespoons of the oil, the yeast packet and half of the contents of the focaccia bread mix. Mix until smooth and blended, and then add the remaining half of the bread mix. Knead the dough until smooth, and then transfer to an oiled bowl, cover, and let rise until doubled, about 15-20 minutes.

Preheat oven to 425°F. Punch the dough down and roll into a 13 x 9-inch rectangle or on a pizza pie dish.  Using your fingers, press dimples into the dough, spaced every inch or so apart. Brush the dough with the remaining oil and sprinkle with salt and any other herbs you wish to add. Bake for 5 minutes, then pop any large air bubbles that may form with a fork, and continue baking until golden, about 8 more minutes. Remove from pan and serve warm with pesto.


Olive-Walnut Country Bread

Ingredients:
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 ½ teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon dried rosemary
1 cup chopped walnuts

Measure all of the above ingredients into a re-sealable jar or bag, and seal, trying to get as much air out as possible. Attach a tag with the following instructions:

To Use Add:
1 1/3 cups buttermilk (or 1 ¼ cup non-dairy milk + 4 teaspoons lemon juice, mixed)
1 egg, beaten
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 cup sliced Kalamata olives, drained
Olive oil

Pre-heat the oven to 375°F. Grease an 8-inch round cake pan or coat with non-stick vegetable cooking spray. In a large bowl, combine the buttermilk (or alternative), egg, 2 tablespoons oil and olives. Slowly add the jar contents until the dough holds together. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead gently for about 30 seconds, just long enough for the dough to become smooth rather than sticky. Do not over-handle the dough.

With floured hands, pat the dough into a round about 8 inches across and 2-inches high. Place in the prepared pan. With a sharp knife, cut a 1/2-inch deep “X” across the top of the loaf. Bake 45-50 minutes or until browned. Remove from the pan. Rub the outside of the loaf with olive oil. Place on rack to cool completely.

Challah

Challah

So if you’re going to do bread recipes, how can you not do a challah recipe? My mom and sister make their doughs and do a first rise in a bread machine, and then take out the dough to shape, do a second rise, and then bake in the oven. Personally, I like to make my dough in my food processor, then take it out to rise, shape, rise again, and bake. Maybe that’s just because I’m not lucky enough to own a bread machine. But hey, whatever works for you, works for me.

I’m going to be setting up a separate page about the laws of taking challah, for those of you who wish to learn more about the it and get the chance to partake in the mitzvah when they are baking bread. You can click here to be taken directly to the page. I am also going to be setting up a how-to page on different braiding techniques for some easy, and some not-so-easy, ways to make a beautiful loaf for your table.

So, having said all that, please enjoy the recipe below. It will make two medium loaves or three small.

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups water, divided
2 large eggs
1 teaspoon salt
⅓ cup oil
5 ½ cups all-purpose flour
½ cup sugar, divided
⅓ cup honey
1 tablespoon active dry yeast
1 egg (for the egg wash)

Directions:

If you are making this in a bread machine, place all of the wet ingredients first (except for the 3rd egg, that is for an egg wash on top of your braided challahs), then all of your dry ingredients, adding your yeast last. Set your machine on the dough setting. Once the machine is done, remove the dough from the machine and braid or shape the bread to your liking. Make an egg wash from the remaining egg and a little water mixed together, brushed on top of the bread. Bake in a preheated 350°F degree oven for about 30 minutes, until the challahs are golden brown and sound hollow when knocked on. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack.

If you are making this recipe by hand or in a food processor, use these directions:

In a medium sized bowl add the yeast, ¼ cup of warm water (heated to 105°F-110°F) and 1 tablespoon sugar. Stir to dissolve and let sit for 5-10 minutes until it becomes frothy, like beer.

In a large bowl or in your food processor fitted with your dough blade, mix together the flour, remaining sugar and salt. Slowly add the wet ingredients until dough begins to form, including the yeast mixture. If using a processor, let the processor run until a ball begins to form around the blade. In either prep method, once a ball has formed, turn it out onto a floured counter and knead the dough for a few minutes so that it comes together to form a nice cohesive elastic dough. Add more flour or water as needed.

Lightly grease a large bowl and put your dough in it to rise. Cover the dough with a dish towel and place in a warm area for about an hour or so, until it has doubled in size.

Turn out your dough on to a floured surface, and punch the bread down to release air bubbles. Knead the dough for another few minutes and then shape/braid your loaf into whatever shape you desire.

Place loaf(s) in oiled pans and cover with a dish towel. Allow to rise in a warm place until again doubled in size, approximately 1 hour. You can top with poppy seeds, sesame seeds, or just egg wash the tops.

Bake at 350°F until bottom of the loaf(s) sound hollow when tapped, about 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack.

Onion & Garlic Cheese Bread

Cheese BreadSo as we know, bread is a staple. It has been around forever, in one form or another, be it loaf, bun or pita. Because of this, our wise Sages worried that  an unsuspecting person might mistake dairy bread for plain pareve bread and eat it together with meat. In doing this, he  would inadvertently violate the prohibition of eating milk and meat together.

So, to stop this problem before it happened, they decreed (Gemara: Pesachim 30a and 36a) that one may not bake dairy bread unless certain criteria are met:

  1. either changing the shape or look of the dough prior to baking, making it instantly recognizable to all as dairy. So if all your loaves are rectangles, then ONLY your dairy ones are round, or having cheese on top of the loaf so one can see at a glance that it is dairy.
  2. baking dairy bread exclusively in small quantities, so that it is consumed all at once and inventory control is in place. You serve the dairy bread at a dairy meal, and don’t have to worry about a leftover roll being used for a meat sandwich.

(FYI – The same prohibition and exclusions apply to meaty bread as well, due to bread’s propensity to be eaten with a dairy meal)

So, having said all that, let’s bring on the cheese bread! Make sure however to follow the guidelines above and to top the loaf with lots of cheese so that is it visible to all that it is a dairy loaf.

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons active dry yeast
½ cup + 2 tablespoons warm water (between 105°F – 110°F)
½ cup warm milk (same temperature as the water)
2 tablespoons sugar
1 ½ teaspoons salt
3 cups flour + flour for dusting
2 tablespoons margarine
2 teaspoons garlic powder
3 tablespoons dried minced onion, divided
1 cup shredded sharp Cheddar cheese + more for topping the loaf
Oil to grease a bowl & pans

Directions:

Combine the yeast, water, milk and sugar in a large bowl. Let it sit for 5-10 minutes until it becomes foamy (like beer).

In a large mixing bowl combine the flour, salt, garlic powder, 2 tablespoons of the minced onion, margarine, and cheese. Add the foamy yeast mixture to the flour mixture and combine to make a dough ball. Knead the dough for a few minutes so that you have a cohesive mix, and it is not too sticky or too dry. Add more flour or water as needed.

Lightly grease a large bowl and put your dough in it to rise. Cover the dough with a dish towel and place in a warm area for about an hour or so, until it has doubled in size.

Turn out your dough on to a floured surface, and punch the bread down to release air bubbles. Knead the dough for another few minutes and then shape your loaf into whatever shape you desire.

Place loaf(s) in oiled pans and cover with a dish towel. Allow to rise in a warm place until again doubled in size, approximately 1 hour. Sprinkle the remaining dried minced onion and cheese over the top of the loaf.

Bake at 350°F until bottom of the loaf(s) sound hollow when tapped, 30-40 minutes. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack. Enjoy with your dairy meal!

Quick & Easy Beer Bread

Beer Bread

So as a double whammy, for a splurge after Pesach, how about a quick and easy Beer Bread? It’s got both wheat flour and beer! How can you go wrong? Check out the recipe below and you will want to bake some for dinner tonight! As always, feel free to play with the savoury aspect of the recipe. Don’t have onion power or Italian seasoning? Don’t like them? Switch to garlic powder, rosemary or sage. Use whatever seasoning your family prefers, including not adding any at all.

Ingredients:

2 ½ cups self-rising flour
½ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon onion powder
¾ teaspoon Italian seasoning
1 (12 fluid ounce) can beer
¼ cup margarine, melted

Directions:

Preheat your oven to 375°F and lightly grease a 9 x 5 inch baking pan.

In a bowl, mix the self-rising flour, all-purpose flour, brown sugar, baking powder, salt, onion powder, and Italian seasoning. Pour in the beer, and mix just until moistened. You will get more of a sticky batter rather than a dough ball. Transfer the batter to your prepared baking pan, and pour the melted margarine over top.

Bake the bread for 45 to 55 minutes in the preheated oven, until a toothpick inserted in the centre comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack. Slice and enjoy!

I’m Back… and I’ve brought some bread with me!

bread

So folks, first off, mea culpa! It has been way too long since I last posted, but work and life has been hectic. To catch you up on the past few months, we’ve had Chanukah, Tu B’Shevat, Purim and Pesach, all prime food holidays, which I admit, I slacked on. My bad. For those of you who would like, I can pull out some menus and recipes from those days and catch you all up. But onwards and upwards! Since we have just finished Pesach, a holiday of no leavened products, I feel the great desire for some real bread. Not potato starch bread. Not a gluten free concoction (though credit does go out to my gluten-intolerant and Celiac friends, I’ve got your backs too! Check out the posts under the Gluten Free Category). I want real, wheat flour based, bread!

So with that in mind, I dedicate the rest of this week to bread! Our proud quiet companion that supports whatever delicious substance we slap between two pieces of it. Without you bread, we wouldn’t have a sandwich. Thank you.

Bannock (Nunavut)

BannockBannock, a quick biscuit–type bread, is a speciality of aboriginal cooks throughout North America, including in Nunavut. For the fluffiest results, toss the ingredients together as few times as possible. When cooking, use two spatulas to turn – one to lift and the other to support – to keep the hot oil from splashing. Enjoy bannock with tea, or serve with soup or stew to soak up the juices. This will make 10 slices of Bannock.

Ingredients:

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
½ cup milk*
½ cup water
vegetable oil, for frying

* For non-dairy Bannock, substitute with soy or almond milk.

Directions:

In bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder and salt. Make well in centre and pour in the milk and water. Toss with fork just until soft, slightly sticky dough forms. Turn out the dough onto a floured surface and with floured hands, press into an 8 inch circle.

Meanwhile, pour enough oil into cast-iron or heavy skillet to come ½ inch up the side. Heat the oil over a medium heat. Fry the dough, turning once, until puffed and golden, and tip of knife inserted in centre comes out clean, about 8 minutes. To serve, cut into 10 pieces.

Banana Orange Cranberry Bread

Cranberry Orange Banana BreadThis is a good use of a few leftover items hanging around your kitchen: Cranberry sauce, bananas and an orange! In fact, when you start to see your bananas heading south, stick them in the freezer for when you wish to make banana bread at a later date, as you’re gonna need the dark overly-ripe ones for the recipe! The original recipe makes 2 – 9×5 inch loaves.

Ingredients:

1 cup white sugar
1 cup shortening
3 eggs
3 mashed bananas (very ripe)
1 orange, peeled and mashed
1 cup cranberry sauce
½ cup milk (you can use soy or water as well)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
4 cups all-purpose flour
1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
½ cup chopped walnuts (or nut of choice)

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly grease two 9×5 inch loaf pans. In a large bowl, cream together the sugar and shortening until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, and mix in bananas, orange, cranberry sauce, milk, and vanilla. In a separate bowl, mix together flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Gradually blend flour mixture into the banana mixture. Fold in walnuts. Pour into the prepared loaf pans. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes in the preheated oven, or until a toothpick inserted in the centre comes out clean. Cool in pan for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack, and cool completely.

Tender Potato Biscuits

Potato BiscuitsThese dense biscuits are a great way to use up extra leftover mashed potatoes. If your potatoes are from a dairy meal or are parve (neither dairy nor meat) feel free to use real milk and add some cheddar to the recipe for a nice twist!

Ingredients:

2 ¾ cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon garlic powder
¼ cup cold margarine
1 ½ cups leftover mashed potatoes
1 egg, beaten
⅓ cup cold water
⅓ cup cold non-dairy milk
2 tablespoons non-dairy milk, or as needed

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, baking powder, garlic powder and salt. Cut in margarine, until the pieces are no larger than peas. Use a fork to stir in mashed potatoes, breaking them up into chunks. Make a well in the mixture, and pour in egg, water and “milk”. Stir into a loose dough using the fork. Turn dough out onto a floured surface, and knead until the dough holds together. Pat the dough out to about ¾ inch thickness, and cut into circles with a biscuit cutter or drinking glass. Place biscuits onto an ungreased baking sheet. Brush the tops with 2 tablespoons “milk”. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes in the preheated oven, or until bottoms are golden.